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Collection

Start With One

Start with One, Invent for Many is a collection of experiments that started by working with one person to make something impactful for them and their community.


If you’re working on a project that starts with one, you can share it here. What starts small can grow with exposure and impact many more people.  

Look to Speak

Start with Sarah Ezekiel


Sarah Ezekiel is an artist, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2000. She is one of millions of people worldwide living with speech and motor impairments.


In 2020, together with her Speech and Language Therapist Richard Cave, she met with a small group from Google exploring how machine learning on smaller devices could make eye-gaze communication technology more accessible to more people.



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LEARN HOW TO USE LOOK TO SPEAK

To help users get set up we’ve created some resources.

Play the Tutorial video here to learn how to use Look to Speak, or find it in the app.

Additional tips can be found in the learn more button below.

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Morse Code Hackathon

Start with The Adaptive Design Association


The Adaptive Design Association builds custom adaptations for people with disabilities. In September 2018, a group of game designers, coders and kids came together for a hackathon to build games with Morse Code, an input system for people with limited mobility. 


This simple yet efficient method was pioneered by Tania Finlayson, who also uses it daily to communicate.

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Community Keijiban

Start with Yamayuri Club of Wakabadai 

The members of the Yamayuri Club of Wakabadai danchi wanted to find a better way to stay connected with each other. They were inspired by the notice boards, or “keijiban,” around their danchi to create an Action that would help them keep track of and remember their activities.
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Seeing Music

Start with Jay Alan Zimmerman


Musician Jay Alan Zimmerman has developed a way of experiencing sounds and music for himself and others who are hard of hearing. His Seeing Music tool is now being used by music teachers – students with hearing disabilities, and by vocal teachers.  


If you’d like to build your own accessible web projects, we’ve assembled a set of accessible web components for you to get started. 

Similar Experiments

Sound Canvas
by Kearney-Volpe / Miele / Phillips / Pereira
A simple drawing tool that works through both sight and sound.
Clarion Lite
by OpenUp Music & Use All Five
An expressive, adaptable musical instrument in your web browser.

Teachable Machine

Start with Steve Saling

Steve Saling is an inventor who created an automated home for himself and others with ALS. He’s now training his own machine learning models to trigger various commands. The idea is to allow more people to regain the ability to communicate and control their environment. 

You can learn more about this ongoing research project, and also stay tuned for open source code which will be included in the upcoming release of Teachable Machine.  
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More info

What is a Start with One project?

Any project where a maker has worked together with one person to make something impactful for them and/or their community. Impact here is not only about the practical. Joy, discovery, and play can also make a difference in people’s lives. 


What do these projects have in common?

Many of the projects built in this spirit share a few common threads:

-They provide real impact for at least one person

-They start small and scrappy

-They result from deep collaborations


Is this only about accessibility?

Not at all. While some Start with One projects are related to accessibility, other ones have involved dancers and older adults in Japan, amongst other communities.


Does my project have to scale to qualify?

No. Even if your project is impactful for only one person, we’d love to see it featured on this site - perhaps the exposure will help it scale 🌱.


How do I find my one to collaborate with?

All around you! There are probably dozens of people or communities around you (your neighbors, your school, your family, your co-workers etc.) who you can work with to spark innovation.


Who are you starting with?

If you’re building something together with one person or community, we would love to hear your own Start with ______ project.


All Experiments


Look to Speak

by Sarah Ezekiel & Google Creative Lab
An Android app which enables people to use their eyes to select pre-written phrases and have...

BYOTM (Bring Your Own Teachable Machine)

by Matt Santamaria
Send text messages to family and friends using your personalized Teachable Machine speech recognizer.

My Storytime

by Instrument
Helping families stay connected even when they're apart. Record stories from anywhere and play...

Project DIVA: Making the Google Assistant More Accessible

by Lorenzo Caggioni
A project to identify solutions and devices to let people with disabilities interact with the...

Body, Movement, Language: AI Sketches With Bill T. Jones

by Bill T. Jones & Google Creative Lab
PoseNet experiments made in collaboration with one of America’s most celebrated and important artists.

Tako Assistant 凧アシスタント

by Akira Kondo, Jun Masuda & Mash Studios
“Tako Assistant” is an Action on Google designed by Akira Kondo 近藤昭, a retired train engineer...

Community Keijiban コミュニティー掲示板

by Toaster
A voice-powered notice board designed by the members of the Wakabadai danchi

Hello, Emmett!

by  Wilson, Xia, Ayalon, Harms, Wysocki, McGough
Help Mr. Maze find the way to his lost items by typing the correct letters in Morse Code

Unlock Favorite Videos with Morse Code

by Pareddy, Yuan, Hsieh, Vigneshwara, Ferguson
Unlock a child’s favorite videos by pressing the right morse code pattern.

Morse Striker

by Park, Kim, Saltz, Jung
In this spy thriller themed soccer game, type the correct letter in Morse Code to hit a target

HSynth

by Kumar, Chaudhary, Melville, Ma, Zhu, Wu
Make music by typing letters in Morse Code and hearing their respective notes

Alphabets Got Talent

by Center, Melville, Owen, Chaudhary
Using Morse Code, input a letter and receive a dancing animal with the same letter
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